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Welcome to My Hungry Boys where I share what I love to cook for my husband and our four sons.   I've made a lot of food over the years and I've learned a lot in the process. 

Mayonnaise

Mayonnaise

I was never a big fan of mayonnaise.  That is, until I started making my own.  Compared to the leading brands, mine is creamier and lighter (thanks to the egg whites), more flavorful (thanks to the dijon mustard, lemon juice, and wine vinegar) and better for you. 

Traditionally, mayonnaise is notoriously difficult to make because the raw egg yolks constantly cause it to break (never attempt the traditional version on a rainy day—the humidity is the culprit).  But my mayonnaise—which uses poached eggs instead of raw eggs—is much more forgiving.  I love it on pretty much any sandwich... a BLT, a turkey sandwich, a veggie sandwich, etc.

Poached Egg Mayonnaise

Adapted from a Daniel Boulud Recipe

Makes about 2 cups mayonnaise.  Recipe can easily be halved.

Note: Due to its dominant flavor and greenish hue, I don't recommend using traditional olive oil for this recipe.  I also don't recommend reducing the quantity of oil; without fail, less oil will result in a runny mayonnaise.

  • 2 eggs, poached.  See recipe here.
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt (or to taste)
  • ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper (or to taste)
  • 1½ cups oil (light tasting olive oil, grapeseed oil, safflower oil, etc.)

Excluding the oil, blend all of the ingredients in a food processor/blender.  While blending, very slowly drizzle the oil into the feed tube, allowing time for the egg to absorb the oil and emulsify.  (If you feel nervous, occasionally turn off the blender and check to see if it's emulsifying.)  Store in the refrigerator (although nothing beats fresh mayonnaise).  Your mayonnaise should last for about 1-2 months before the oil begins to separate.

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